We won the match

says Burns, and seems to think that means he is let off the hook.

No, little plod, winning a match does not actually make it ok to tell lies and manipulate people into doing what yu wanted but they voted against. It really does not.

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Neither Burns nor his doxy is over-endowed with thinking skills, seemingly

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Oh, and what a surprise that the sodding women saved the day.

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If I were a woman who had been invited to play, I might well refuse on the grounds that I liked being lied to and about quite as little as the men did.

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I wouldn’t be playing.

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Well, no, nor would I: like most of the people over fifty in Ambridge, Usha being the notable idiotic exception, I don’t think that learning to play cricket when you are that age is a particularly good plan . But were I for instance Brenda, who is a cricketer and won the single wicket one year, I would decline to be Harrison’s “token nigger” anyhow. (This is deliberately derogatory language: derogatory not about anyone of any race, but about the people who say things like “some of my best friends are x” or use faux anti-prejudice as a way to get their own way.)

Harrison doesn’t like women or want them in the cricket team, in particular: he was faced with a short team and a girlfriend who told him to invite women to play too, and did as he was told. I bet he now wishes that he hadn’t.

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[quote=“Fanta, post:6, topic:508”]
derogatory not about anyone of any race, but about the people who say things like “some of my best friends are x”
[/quote]Understood, and agreed, but promise me you’ll not take that argument to “another place”.

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I wouldn’t. One of the things I like about here is that I can explain that and not be jumped on as if I were a criminal.

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I’m always rather suspicious of “sanitised” versions of texts. For whose benefit are the offending words removed or replaced? It always smacks of denial.

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It is always for the benefit of the censor, in my experience. Whoever it is fears that someone who has offended him or her self about it may make trouble for the censor. It is easier to remove the cause of offence than to deal with the whinges.

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Oh, I have reported you to the appropriate authorities*, Fanta, don’t you worry ;- ) Funnily enough, I have never heard that particular form of words: ‘token Black’ often, though. I must say that the N-word is one of the very few that genuinely shocks me when I come across it ‘fresh’ - i.e., not in older writings.

*the Appropriate Authority blinked, gave me a snooty look, and continued fettling her paw.

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It was used, widely, at one point to describe the way that some of the older Working Men’s Clubs reluctantly entered the twentieth century at one point by allowing in one woman each; one of them, I forget who she was, somewhere like Barnsley (Yorks not Glos), said crossly that she was damned if she would be their token nigger, and it caught on.

Before that I suspect it may have been something that happened in the States: look how enlightened we are, we have even allowed in a black man. Just the one, in each case… He was also the one black man in any TV series, at one point.

I used it precisely because it is rude, and indicative of an outlook I tend to despise, where the object of the condescension is still despised but the person/people doing it is/are pretending otherwise.

Burns still expects Fallon to make the teas, doesn’t he.

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I know the concept, and I appreciated why you used the word and no criticism was intended: I was just observing that I have only ever heard the phrase with Black rather than Nigger.
It would be rather difficult to read Joseph Conrad on the bus without feeling uncomfortable, I suspect. Perhaps I should try it. My father would be proud (that I was reading more Conrad, I hasten to add).

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Talking of sociolinguistics and race, there’s the makings of an interesting thesis in examining the shift from the Hispanic “negro” to the anglophone “black”. I’m sure someone’s probably done it…

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Interesting that a Tory MP used the “woodpile” reference today and the proverbial ton of bricks has decended. Several times !

Careless for an MP, given the inevitable media and perfect-people reaction, but I’m not sure it’s deserving of a lynching (Ooops. There I go again !!)

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As we know, it is against the rules of at least one political party to say anything which can be interpreted as being anti-Semitic even if it is historical fact, and will get you suspended from the party.