So, who wants to help ... to take refuge in the Cellar?


#7408

She fancies having scrambled eggs, tomatoes and Fresh White Bread straight out of the oven, so that is what she’ll get. Possibly with a Chinese-style chicken-and-noodle soup to go before it if she is hungry. And a banana to follow, ditto.


#7409

That sounds lovely, Fishy

I have just added Hot Stock & Dry Sherry to the makings of Chicken & Mushroom Pie

Itizz Ferkin’ Cold here, anna Pie can be very soothing

Carinthia.xx


#7410

I am going to have the remains of this week’s Stew for supper.


#7411

Nut roast, sprouts, roast potatoes and Chantenay carrots, green beans, Yorkshire puds and veggie gravy must suffice around these parts. The weather forecast has turned quite chilly, for tomorrow and I could have done with a bit of goose fat for me tatties.
Soo xx


#7412

I suppose I should have said ‘comforting’, but soothing works ok too

Right , what’s in a name ?

Stew

Here’s a thing

What do you mean by Stew ? Meat, Onions, Gravy with Possible Dumplings ?

Or

Anything which moves, into the pot

We used to have Shin Beef & Gravy which my Mother cooked in the pressure cooker

Divine - must put Shin Beef on The List

We also had what she called Broth , which was either Stewing Beef, Braising Steak, or whichever was cheaper at the Butcher, padded out with Carrots, Turnip/Swede, Parsnips, Onions & served with Mashed Taters

Both were delicious, but the fiddly to prepare Shin Beef was my favourite

BiL will not, & never has eaten ‘Stew’

Howsumevva

The Dozy Bugga will eat Casserole, or Ragout, or Boeuf Bourgignon

Carinthia.xx


#7413

Stew = beef (or goat or chicken or pork or lamb or hearts – whatever is on special offer in Lidl, usually), softened onions, carrots, mushrooms, tinned tomatoes, salt, herbs and wine, put into the slow cooker and left to get on with it. At a later point, juice strained off, thickened by means of a roux, and then added to the stew again for a bit more cooking. That’s the basic recipe; whatever is in need of using up may be added, as it might be a leek or some celery, but that isn’t necessary and in this case hasn’t happened. Serve with a baked potato if you think of it, or new bread, or pasta shapes, or at a pinch rice.


#7414

Sorry, I should have said that Fish Stew didn’t feature in my childhood.

Vegetables aplenty, but we, as in Mum, Brother, et Moi had them as Vegetable Soup, rather than Stew

Mental image of my Father turning in his grave goes here-------->

He was a Meat & Bread & Butter Irishman…

He only came home from work every 6 weeks, for the weekend, so that weekend was a Meat Feast

My Mother did buy a joint for Sundays, as she could make it ‘stretch’, in many delicious ways, until the Wednesday or Thursday

Carinthia. xx


#7415

We had the roast on Saturday evening because my mother demanded, and got, a day of rest on Sunday! It stretched, with cold meat on Sunday and something like cottage pie on Monday, and sometimes spag bol on Tuesday; we had an antique Spong mincer, through which the meat and some onion and then a couple of slices of stale bread “to clean the mincer” would be put.

Lovely Nourishing Soup was a feature of winters: my mother had a wartime recipe from her mother, which started “Borrow a dog. Go to the butcher and beg a marrow bone for the dog. After you have left the shop, remove the bone from the dog and take it home to wash thoroughly. Boil up for stock…” and then had whatever veg she had available added to the stock and cooked. Once, a visiting Italian lecturer greeted it as minestrone! Only it wasn’t really, because the only vegetable she never added was beans, or I would infallibly be sick.

I still have her stock-pot, a wartime “utility” one which holds about four litres of liquid and used to be boiled up all the time for stock, which was used for soups and stews and to pour over the dog’s biscuits so he would enjoy them instead of just accepting them. Our butcher delivered, and if she had spent more than a certain amount that week he always included something extra: bones “for the dog” (hah!), or some liver, or something which hadn’t sold well and needed to be cooked before it went off.


#7416

…surely requires a Diana Wynne Jones reference?


#7417

Stew -> scurvy was the entry, I think.


#7418

Sounds entirely plausible! I just remember it being the sole menu item at assorted inns and taverns. Will have to dig out the book again. (Any excuse!)


#7419

Look for “Eternal Quest”…


#7420

And follow cross-reference, if memory serves… :grin:


#7421

That’s the one.


#7422

Ah
The Spong Mincer

The Stockpot

The Soup

The Butcher delivering

Happy Sigh

Carinthia.xx


#7423

Well, it was The Boy, really. He had a huge basket on the front of a bicycle with the shop name on a sort of tin sheet in the middle of it between the crossbar and the pedals, and he claimed that the tyres were made of solid rubber.


#7424

Stew is cooked on the hob casserole in the oven

I had to do the shopping on Saturday and then cooking all week as my mother spent extravagant amounts of time in hospital

I hated traipsing from shop to shop in our seaside town with the boarders from school let loose for a while all looking at me as if I were dog muck on their shoes

Just cos I had the weeks shopping in my hands and I had to get food on the table for a precise time

A joint did three meals and packed lunches for my father and me for a few days too


#7425

Slowcooker is not hob but also is not oven…

I am working my way through this entire thread finding bits of it which will be Seeds for my Memoirs, and it is my opinion that we might open a new cellar when we get to ten thousand posts; it’s awfu’ long to get to the top of it, and I am now down as far as #1220 with a lot to go.


#7426

Don’t bother with any of my seedy bits, Fishers.
Soo xx


#7427

'S my memoirs! Sudden Daughter keeps demanding that I do them…

And things I write to the Reporter make good places to start on bits, like the goings-on with the Border Collie at Cornwallis Crescent reminding me of other things there, and stuff about my mother’s cooking.